Dance Party!

bootstrap dress form tutorial: inner support, stuffing, & mounting

Today – we finish our Bootstrap Dress form! Yes, you heard right!

Dance Party!

The four parts of this tutorial:
Post 1: Preparing your pattern
Post 2: Cutting and marking your fabrics
Post 3: Constructing the shell
Post 4: Inner support, stuffing, and mounting

First, I want to thank all of you who’ve commented and followed – and texted me through Instagram and Facebook. After I hit “publish” on this post, I will make sure I have responded to all comments thus far posted. But remember, if you don’t hear from me – email me! The squeaky wheel, and all that!

A recap: Bootstrap’s dress forms are custom-drafted patterns that you generate, sew, and pack, then mount on a stand. They come with an inner sleeve and support structure, and include cardboard and foam to bolster the base, arm, and neck. Bootstrap offers two versions: a misses size, and a plus size. They are both sewn by an identical process. Both forms correct for posture, shoulder shape, belly protuberance, and buttocks shape. There are also additional measurements you can take to customize the form: neck circumference, shoulder width, bust height, front length, back length, and back width.

As for this tutorial series, there are four posts. In my first post, I covered how to take your measurements and record your body build, generate your pattern, and gather your supplies. In the second post, we prepared our fabrics, cut, and marked out pieces. In my last post, we constructed our shell.

Today, we construct the inner support, stuff the form, and mount it!

If you are just now finding this series, you can find out how to generate the pattern and collect supplies in my first post.

boostrap dress form (misses size)

boostrap dress form (plus size)

So let’s get started! 

 

We are beginning on the page that is headed with:

Pin the Neck Top to the Neck, matching notches and stitch

Sewing the neck top, to the neckline is a pretty easy stitch. You want to make sure there are no bumps or ripples, then trim and grade well. This seam is highly visible on the form.


Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

 

Now it’s time to sew the armhole covers to the armhole! We’ll be sewing the outer armhole closed first, and then adding the inner armhole piece and inserting our cardboard support. The armhole covers are such that I find the markings designating “front” and “back” to be very helpful here:

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting


Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Pinned, checked, and ready for sewing:

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

After sewing the armhole closed, I like to trim and grade well here. Again, this is a highly visible seam on the finished product:

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Now, we get to baste the stabilizer armhole covers to the inside of the form, and slip in the cardboard as we go! I found I could easily shift the cardboard and finish up the stitch by machine.

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & MountingBootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

We are now on the page headed by:

INNER SUPPORT


Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Above, you can see I made sure to secure and trim the top edge of the sleeve. Your piece may have been cut on the fold as per instructions, but mine was not (to conserve yardage). Either way is fine.

At this point, I like to insert the sleeve and make sure it slides in smoothly and easily, but without a lot of slack:

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

It’s time to carefully cut the lower, unsewn edge of the pipe sleeve into fringe, 1″ to 3/4″. This fringe will be used to secure to the bottom cardboard structure and help stabilize the form when it’s mounted.

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Now it’s time for our inner support pieces! These pieces confused me at first, but they are simply a stabilizing structure to keep the form from twisting and sagging. We’re affixing the straight parts of these support pieces, to the pipe sleeve seam allowances; and affixing the curved edges of these pieces, the seam allowances at front and center back.

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Sandwiching the pipe sleeve seam allowance in between the two support pieces for the back pieces, we stitch together right on the seamline.

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

We then flip those front pieces out away from the sleeve, and repeat the above process for the back support pieces.

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Looking good! You can give the assembly a light press, if you like.

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Now it’s time to stitch vertical lines through these curved stabilizing pieces – not the sleeve! – to add more structure. Shown below, in a chartreuse thread:

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Now as shown in instructions, lay the pattern pieces on the inner structure and make sure your notches correspond (top photo on the page that’s first text reads: “Place the pattern pieces on top of the correlate details…” and yes, that’s a typo on that page).

Now here’s a bit of a tricky part – but only if you’ve topstitched those center front and back seams. We are going to pin those curved front and back raw edges of the inner support, to the corresponding center front, and center back seams. This means I open up those center seams, and means I’ll be sewing four seams in total.

Pin and sew slowly!

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Once you’ve determined your support is installed firmly and with all notches met, it’s time to set the shell aside and work on the neck. The neck piece is cut from your 3″ sponge (or stacked sponges secured with a light adhesive). I use an electric carving knife to cut my foam. It doesn’t have to be perfect!

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

It is oddly satisfying to install the neck here! Push it right up into the finished neck top.

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

After inspecting your neck top to make sure everything looks good, set aside the assembly and pick up the four base pieces. Pin front base pieces together, and back base pieces together, right-sides together. Stitch along the straight edge and around the pipe opening.Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Clip and grade:

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & MountingTurn and press:
Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Now, install your zipper. Hand-basting is always a good idea for a zipper installation. This zipper won’t show to the public much, but you do want an accurate install as the base size should match the dress form’s raw edge circumference.

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting
Before installing the zipper, I switched to a zipper foot:Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting
Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & MountingNow, we are in our last bit of stitching!

We are installing the dress form to the base, making sure we do not stitch in any puckers or pulling. I sewed with the base against the feed dogs, but you might find it easier to flip the assembly with the body of the form against the machine. Again – stitch slowly to make sure things go together smoothly.Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting
Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Can you believe it? We are all finished with our sewing!

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Now comes the fun part. “Fun”, she says – the stuffing! This takes a bit of time, but not as much as you might think. Stuff firmly, using small amounts to reduce lumpiness. Have your tape measure close by to make sure you stuff to the right Bust, Waist, and Hip measurements. Make sure to stuff the breasts firmly.Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Can you see above, that on the bust of the half-stuffed form, I have a few puckers? This is where I hadn’t fused enough when I interfaced. Fortunately, it is easy to re-fuse here. Have a friend insert their hand and push the stuffing up into the form. Use steam to re-fuse any ripples out, being careful not to steam-burn yourself or your friend!

After your form is stuffed, insert the cardboard base support (as per instructions), and haul out your fringe to glue or tape to the cardboard from. Then use the oval holes to continue to stuff until the form is firm.

Some people will not want to mount the form on a stand; for completeness’ sake, I went ahead and did so. We bought an inexpensive stand on Amazon and cut it to size (an adjustable stand would be ideal, as it’s rather difficult to make sure to get your height perfect, when doing this part!). You notice we cleverly used the PVC pipe flange end, to hold the PVC inner pipe, and we stabilized this flange piece with a few bolts. 

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

Here is my model, standing alongside their form!
Bootstrap Dress Form Tutorial: Inner Support, Stuffing, & Mounting

So there we have it! BOOM!

Style

I hope you’ve enjoyed putting together your dress form as much as I have!

Thank you for all your participation. And please leave any comments you have – or post links to your form! And enjoy your new studio’s tool!

Fashion!

Late getting started? Pick up your pattern here: MISSES or PLUS

boostrap dress form (misses size)

boostrap dress form (plus size)

The four parts of this tutorial:
Post 1: Preparing your pattern
Post 2: Cutting and marking your fabrics
Post 3: Constructing the shell
Post 4: Inner support, stuffing, and mounting

 

boostrap dress form (misses size)

bootstrap dress form tutorial: cutting and marking your fabrics

I barely have my toe in this dress form and I can already tell it’s going to be great! 

Last post, I covered how to take your measurements and record your body build, generate your pattern, and gather your supplies. Today, I will be covering fabric preparation, cutting, and marking.

The four parts of this tutorial:
Post 1: Preparing your pattern
Post 2: Cutting and marking your fabrics
Post 3: Constructing the shell
Post 4: Inner support, stuffing, and mounting

A recap: Bootstrap’s dress forms are custom-drafted patterns that you generate, sew, and pack, then mount on a stand. They come with an inner sleeve and support structure, and include cardboard and foam to bolster the base, arm, and neck. Bootstrap offers two versions: a misses size, and a plus size. They are both sewn by an identical process. Both forms correct for posture, shoulder shape, belly protuberance, and buttocks shape. There are also additional measurements you can take to customize the form: neck circumference, shoulder width, bust height, front length, back length, and back width.

If you are just now finding this series, you can find out how to generate the pattern and collect supplies in my first post.

boostrap dress form (misses size)

boostrap dress form (plus size)

So let’s get started!

¡Vamanos!

Today, we are preparing our fabrics (by prewashing and fusing), cutting, and marking. This is part of the process of sewing I used to dislike. But now, I really enjoy it. It gives me an opportunity to familiarize myself with the pattern.

So first, I cut out all eighteen pieces of my paper pattern.

Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

In this case, I labeled how many of each piece I want to cut out (note there is an error on the PATTERN PIECES page of the instructions: under piece #15 “Back Inner Support”, we want to cut out two). Two images down, I also prepared a schematic so you can tell how many pieces, and of what medium, you will be cutting.

This is important: if you plan on topstitching your center front and center back seamlines, you will likely want to add a larger seam allowance to these seams. This is especially true if you aren’t sure if you can sew an exact 3/8″ seam.

Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

Now, we need to determine how much main/self-fabric to cut. We will need to interface all of these pattern pieces. You want to take the pieces in the top section “CUT FROM SELF-FABRIC (INTERFACED)”, and lay them out on your self fabric. In the schematic below, I’ve kept the orientation along lengthwise grain. The bottom two pattern pieces are cut from cardboard so grain does not matter. Here is a PDF if you want to download and print this guide, and make notes.

Bootstrap dress form, pattern layout

 

[ PDF link ]

Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

Shown below, my woven interfacing. As per the pattern’s instructions, you want to pre-shrink all fabrics. You may want to pre-treat the interfacing too. Battles rage over the issue of interfacing pre-treatment! I always say, “follow the manufacturer’s instructions”.


Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

My thirteen year old son fused all my self fabric for me! What a doll. This process takes a bit of time. Make sure to get a very good fuse, aligning the grain of the interfacing with the grain of the fabric!


Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

Once your self yardage is fused properly, it’s time to fold, pin or weight, and cut! This part gets so exciting! In general, for this pattern it’s a good idea to leave the paper pattern pieces pinned to the fabric pieces even after cutting, and you’ll see why in a moment.

Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

There are many notches in this pattern – to help you line things up beautifully. I clipped 1/8″ into the seam allowance for all notches.

Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

Now let’s talk about those awesome horizontal lines at bust, underbust, waist, and hip! They not only will help with fitting issues – they look pretty swanky on the dress form! I marked mine immediately, using a tracing wheel without a tracing medium, and very firm pressure. This makes a near-invisible line on the fabric – but depending on your eyesight, you may want to use a tracing medium. If you plan to re-use this pattern, tape these areas with clear tape before you use the wheel.

Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

I then went over these faint lines with some white chalk:Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

I set aside all my pieces, with the paper pinned to each. The armhole cover will have two self fabric pieces, and two interlining pieces:

Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

Once we’ve cut our self fabric pieces, it’s time to cut our interlining. This interlining and sleeve, forms the inner structure to keep the from stable. The interlining pieces – front and back supports, and the pipe sleeve, are all cut from sturdy interlining fabric.

When it comes to the pipe sleeve, there are several marks for sleeve width depending on the diameter of your pipe. My pipe is 1 1/2 inches, which corresponds to 3.8 cm. I cut a sleeve piece from the 4 cm width, by tearing my fabric along the grain. Don’t worry too much about this right now, because when we get to sewing up this sleeve we will be checking for fit. You mostly do not want to cut a sleeve that is too narrow!

Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

Cardboard times! We are cutting the two pieces without seam allowances – the base support and armhole cardboard (17 and 18). I elected to trace using carbon paper, and cut with a fresh razor blade.

Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

Make sure to cut and mark the armhole cardboard as mirror images. I suggest doing them one at a time, rather than in layers:

Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

Shown below – all of my pieces! Cardboard pieces are at top-left, and interlining at top-right. All the remaining pieces are interfaced self fabric. The two neck pieces – the circular top and the neck itself – only have one copy per paper piece.

Bootstrap Dress Form: Prepping Fabric, Cutting, & Marking

So there we have it! Great job!

Awesome!

Next up, we begin sewing! If you have any questions, please feel free to comment here!

Late getting started? Pick up your pattern here: MISSES or PLUS

boostrap dress form (misses size)

boostrap dress form (plus size)

 

Fabulous!

bootstrap dress form tutorial: preparing your pattern

Bootstrap’s new dress form pattern is incredible, and I am here to help make it a reality for you!

Fabulous!

The four parts of this tutorial:
Post 1: Preparing your pattern
Post 2: Cutting and marking your fabrics
Post 3: Constructing the shell
Post 4: Inner support, stuffing, and mounting

So many dressmakers struggle with fit when they sew for themselves. It becomes obvious relatively early on, that a body double would be a wonderful helpmate – and that is where dress forms come in. You can purchase standard dress forms, and those help a great deal. Standard forms can be expensive, and they are not shaped for realistic posture and distribution of body fat for the vast majority. There are other options: custom forms that are more expensive still. You can make your own through various DIY processes, but these methods can be arduous and can result in an ugly mannequin which for some, is a dealbreaker. Some people who want a form don’t want to have a “buddy” measure and wrap them in duct tape.

You get the idea.

The new Bootstrap pattern eliminates all these issues! I am very excited for this project as it is not only a great boon to my own studio, but making one is the perfect gift for another seamstress! And I already know who is first on my list! 🙂

So for those new(ish) to sewing, this project is easy enough for a committed beginner, but it also is a bit of a detailed process. My advice is to carefully read through this post first, before starting. Don’t worry if you get too overwhelmed when reading ahead. The instructions provided in the pattern are second-to-none, and I will be blogging my efforts over the next few days. You can also post questions here at my site.

Today, I will be covering taking measurements and body build, generating your pattern, and gathering your supplies.

Bootstrap’s dress forms involve two versions: a misses size, and a plus size (I will be creating a misses size for this sew-along; the processes are identical, however). The plus size version is shaped with a bit more curvature, as you can easily see from the site’s photos. But both forms correct for posture, shoulder shape, belly protuberance, and buttocks shape. There are also additional measurements you can take to customize the form: neck circumference, shoulder width, bust height, front length, back length, and back width. In short, this form includes every posture variance you can imagine, for a torso.

boostrap dress form (misses size)

boostrap dress form (plus size)

You will first need to create a Bootstrap Fashion account, before proceeding. This is very simple (just in case, here is my walk-through on the Tea & Crumpet sew-along from 2016). Next, select the pattern: misses size, or plus. You will notice immediately there are a series of fields you need to fill out, as well as a “fit adjustments” tab that includes more measurements. I will first go over the measurements listed under “customize”, as those are all that are needed to generate your pattern.

bootstrap dress form sal measurements

Before starting, I find it helpful to tie a string around one’s waist (where the body creases, if you bend to the side. If you do not have a prominent C7 vertebrae at the base of the neck, you can put on a necklace and the point where the necklace naturally hangs, will serve as that location.

Height is self-explanatory; most of us know our height. If you do not, or if you are making for someone else, simply stand in sock feet at a wall and use a pencil to make a mark flush with the top of the head. Then, step away from the wall and measure, with a tape perpendicular to the floor, the height. Let’s move on.

BUST

bootstrap measurement bust

Bootstrap Dress Form: Measuring, Printing Pattern, & Assembling Materials.

UNDERBUST

bootstrap measurement underbust

Bootstrap Dress Form: Measuring, Printing Pattern, & Assembling Materials.

WAIST

This measurement is taken directly over the string you tied.

bootstrap measurement waistBootstrap Dress Form: Measuring, Printing Pattern, & Assembling Materials.

LOW HIP

Measure around the fullest part of your hips and buttocks. If you have a large bum and also a protruding tummy that is higher up on the body than this measurement, don’t worry – we’ll be adding another metric in to account for belly ease.

bootstrap measurement low hip

Bootstrap Dress Form: Measuring, Printing Pattern, & Assembling Materials.

BELLY PROTUBERANCE, BUTTOCKS SHAPE, AND POSTURE

I put these three together as one full-body side profile picture will tell the tale here. Please take a photo rather than relying on your own “sense” of your figure, or your client’s figure.

bootstrap measurement belly protuberance bootstrap measurement buttocks shape bootstrap measurement evaluate posture

Bootstrap Dress Form: Measuring, Printing Pattern, & Assembling Materials.

My model here is a belly protuberance B, an “average” buttocks shape, and a straight back.

SHOULDER SLOPE

This is another metric best served by a photo. You can see my model has between a “square” and “normal” shoulder slope.

bootstrap measurement shoulder slope

Bootstrap Dress Form: Measuring, Printing Pattern, & Assembling Materials.

Those are all the measurements you need, to print your pattern! You will be selecting the method of deployment (I select a 36″ pdf to print at the copy shop, as I dislike printing and taping). If you like, you can “Get a Free Pattern Preview”, in order to look at your pattern first before purchasing it:

bootstrap free pattern preview

For this preview, you simply proceed as if making a purchase – you will be “charged” $0.00. After you complete your purchase and the pattern builds (this takes no longer than 15 minutes), you can view the preview either via the Bootstrap email that will be deployed (check your Junk Mail folder if you do not see it in your Inbox), or under your “My Account” page, by clicking TO ACCESS YOUR PATTERNS, PLEASE CLICK HERE>>. Bootstrap stores all your patterns and instructions in this kiosk.

bootstrap to access your patterns

Once you are satisfied, you can purchase the pattern as per the above steps.

Now, I will speak to the “fit adjustments” second tab. These measurements are not required to generate your pattern. You should only add them if you are sure. You can also get a free preview of your pattern to check to see that things look good; however if you are a newbie, you may not even know enough to know if your generated pattern is off, or not! In that case, I’d suggest sticking with the measurements in the “customize” feature only.

So here are the fit adjustments:

bootstrap measurements fit adjustment

NECK CIRCUMFERENCE

bootstrap measurement neck circumference

Bootstrap Dress Form: Measuring, Printing Pattern, & Assembling Materials.

SHOULDER WIDTH SPAN

This is measured between bony shoulder points. Most people have a curvature here, so go ahead and measure directly atop this curvature if so.

bootstrap measurement shoulder width span

Bootstrap Dress Form: Measuring, Printing Pattern, & Assembling Materials.

BUST HEIGHT FROM CB NECK POINT AND FRONT LENGTH FROM CB NECK POINT

I’ve said a mouthful! I include these together as you can take them at the same time. You are measuring from the C7 bony point at the neck, around and atop the bust apex, and down perpendicular to the waist. The number on the tape at the bust apex, is your bust height measurement. The number at the wait, front length.

Bootstrap Dress Form: Measuring, Printing Pattern, & Assembling Materials.

BACK LENGTH

This is a measurement familiar to many of us. We measure from the C7 neck point, straight down to the waist.

bootstrap measurement back length

Bootstrap Dress Form: Measuring, Printing Pattern, & Assembling Materials.

BACK WIDTH

This is measured across the shoulder blades, right where the skin of the arm meets the skin of the back.

bootstrap measurement back widthNote in this photo below, it looks like the measurement is too low; it is not, it is just that by bending their arms back, the model has effectively lifted the crease height up. This is the one measurement here that is best-served by having someone assist you – you can take the measurement with your clothes on, and let your partner feel for the crease.

Bootstrap Dress Form: Measuring, Printing Pattern, & Assembling Materials.

Having taken our additional measurements, we can add the pattern, preview, and purchase.

Now let’s talk about our supplies!

Once you’ve purchased your pattern, you will note (in both your email and your My Account patterns files) that the pattern includes a very thorough series of directions, that detail supplies. Read through your directions – don’t worry if you’re a bit confused, as the instructions are thorough and will help you through the process.

Here are my supplies, and a few notes about them:

Bootstrap Dress Form: Measuring, Printing Pattern, & Assembling Materials.

I will be using a main fabric (mid-to-heavyweight with drape cotton twill), an interfacing to interface the entire shell of the form, and an interlining fabric for structural support (a mid-to-heavyweight duck). The instructions talk a bit more about fabric requirements. I will also need cardboard for the neck, armhole, and bottom of the form. I need a PVC pipe from 36″ to 48″ long, sized at a diameter that will fit over the stand I plan to use (this is important, as we will cut an inner sleeve to fit snugly over this PVC. I also need two zippers for the bottom closure, adhesive to glue the interlining to the PVC, cutting implements to cut the cardboard templates, and poly-fill (2 kg to 5 kg or 5 to 12 lbs).

So there we have it! I will be blogging my progress through the form through early August. If you have any questions about the process, please feel free to comment here! If you have any issues with Bootstrap, do email Yuliya (you will get an email from her when you buy your pattern) – she is very responsive.

So let’s get to it!

Rock and Roll!

Customize your pattern here: MISSES or PLUS

boostrap dress form (misses size)

boostrap dress form (plus size)

 

two sew-alongs: save the date(s)!

Welp.

Please don’t think I’m some dorky try-hard sew-along weirdie. I’m not.* It’s just that the next two sew-alongs involve a wee bit of planning – particularly February’s. So I’m offering up two sew-alongs, both with three pieces, in order that you have plenty of time to commit and plan.

January’s focus on a babywear layette, and February’s on an ensemble from Bootstrap! Our size choices for babywear are preemie to 6T; Bootstrap’s size range is from a 17″ to 67″ chest / 18″ to 68″ hip. I like my sew-alongs to have as large a size range as possible!

* indicates required
 

 

 

(I am also looking for ideas for my final sew-along in my year-long series. If you have any, please do comment here, email me, or share on Facebook!)

Summer Dress In Double-Gauze: Samples

tres mujeres; tres vestidos

So yesterday I had the immense pleasure of spending an afternoon with three lovely women, in three versions of my latest summer dress.

An ivory with geometric motif in charcoal, for Phoenix:

Summer Dress In Double-Gauze: Samples

A gorgeous teal for Astrid (um, what is up with her perfect accessories? Tomato-red toenails and heels; beaded earrings in canary? XOMG):

Summer Dress In Double-Gauze: Samples

And a gorgoues double-faced periwinkle for Jen:

Summer Dress In Double-Gauze: Samples
Needless to say we had a lovely time – and a fabulous lunch afterwards at Frontagers. I couldn’t help thinking these three women looked like three gorgeous summer blooms!

Summer Dress In Double-Gauze: Samples
I am providing a sew-along for this very dress. Here is a supply post: we start stitching on June 15th. This sew-along is appropriate for beginners, intermediate stitchers, or advanced practitioners. In addition, it is a wonderful pattern to get acquainted with Bootstrap Fashion, one of my beloved pattern companies.

See you soon! <3

Summer Dress In Double-Gauze: Samples

Tea & Crumpet Sew-Along

tea & crumpet sew-along: the collar and lining

Tea & Crumpet Sew-Along

Hello and welcome to day five of our sew-along – our penultimate post! Today we will be installing collar and lining. For this entry, you will need:

1. Your constructed dress shell and lining
2. Your collar pieces

In our last entry we finished our back closure. We should have a constructed shell and lining, and our collar pieces. Our construction order will depend on the collar we’ve used – the asymmetrical or tie collar options. For the assymetrical collar, we put the collar in and then the lining; for the tie-collar, we install the lining first.

Ready? We’re in the home stretch! You can do it!

You Can Do It!

Tea & Crumpet Sew-Along

tea & crumpet sew-along: the back closure

Tea & Crumpet Sew-Along

Hello and welcome to day four of our sew-along! Today we will be installing our back closure. For this entry, you will need:

1. Your constructed bodice shell
2. Your closure hardware (buttons or zipper)
3. An invisible zipper foot (for a zipper closure)

In our last entry we finished our bodice, minus the collars. Today we install our back closure, which can either take a few minutes (for a zipper) – or a lot longer, if you’ve opted for buttons.

Ready? LET’S DO THIS!

Celebrate!

Tea & Crumpet Sew-Along

tea & crumpet sew-along: cutting, marking, & constructing the bodice

Tea & Crumpet Sew-Along

Hello and welcome to day two of our sew-along! Today we are cutting, marking, and constructing our bodice – both the fashion fabric, and the lining. Remember that the sew-along posts and questions are hosted on Facebook, in the “Sew Alongs & Sewing Contests” group.

For this entry, we are cutting our fabrics and constructing our bodice. You will need:

1. Your fashion fabric and lining fabrics, pre-treated
2. Tracing paper, tracing medium and wheel
3. Your machine, ready to rumble!

Let’s go!
Intensity!